Realization

Shouting at you as
You did not listen to me….
I did not realize, dear Friend!
Words not heard,
May be said again

Quarreling with you for
Not keeping a word…
I did not realize, dear Friend!
Promises not kept,
May be forgotten

Hating you when
You shared moments with someone else…
I did not realize, dear Friend!
Hearts broken,
May be mended

Tears falling from my eyes
Seeing you as you are
Without words, without life…
I realize now, dear Friend!
Souls departed,
Will not be returned

Realization

Shouting at you as
You did not listen to me….
I did not realize, dear Friend!
Words not heard,
May be said again

Quarreling with you for
Not keeping a word…
I did not realize, dear Friend!
Promises not kept,
May be forgotten

Hating you when
You shared moments with someone else…
I did not realize, dear Friend!
Hearts broken,
May be mended

Tears falling from my eyes
Seeing you as you are
Without words, without life…
I realize now, dear Friend!
Souls departed,
Will not be returned

Time to Part

Pre-Blog Statement: Friends, I really seem to be running out of new ideas… so let me just put up a little poem I wrote some 5 years ago, while I think of some new topic. Any suggestions please tell me in the comments section. Thank you.

The time is here
For us to part
The memories are sweet
The pranks we played
The jokes we cracked…

Those days may never return
But I shall never forget,
How you stood by my
Every sorrow & joy,
And how I stood by yours…

We thrived in each other’s company,
Now as we part,
I want to see you smile
I would cherish it
If you cry I shall feel
Sorrow upon your memory

So, I want to leave you smiling
Like the wonderful friend that you are
For, I might be leaving your sight, Friend
But not your heart…

Time to Part

Pre-Blog Statement: Friends, I really seem to be running out of new ideas… so let me just put up a little poem I wrote some 5 years ago, while I think of some new topic. Any suggestions please tell me in the comments section. Thank you.

The time is here
For us to part
The memories are sweet
The pranks we played
The jokes we cracked…

Those days may never return
But I shall never forget,
How you stood by my
Every sorrow & joy,
And how I stood by yours…

We thrived in each other’s company,
Now as we part,
I want to see you smile
I would cherish it
If you cry I shall feel
Sorrow upon your memory

So, I want to leave you smiling
Like the wonderful friend that you are
For, I might be leaving your sight, Friend
But not your heart…

Other Life

Pre-Blog Statement: If you came in search of good fiction, then this is definitely not it! I took about 15 minutes to think and write this story… which means it’s not very good… and the fact that I was writing this with a headache didn’t make matters any better. So let this piece stay for a while before I get my lazy-self to refine it later…

“This has got to work!” Ravi spoke with a look of anxiety, “I’ve been spending months on trying to build this system.”

“Stop being so paranoid, Ravi. You know hard work never goes to waste…” said Murali, his fellow scentist at the Akshaya Space Centre.

“Sure hope you are right. Well, do you believe that there is life on other planets?”

“Maybe…”

“What do you mean ‘Maybe’? There have been so many signs over the past few decades… there may be something out there… maybe humans like us… or maybe better evolved…”

“Yes, yes. I’m sure there are people out there in some distant planet… and maybe there’s someone named Ravi there too, who wants to know so much about life here!” said Murali, grinning at his colleague.

Ravi, however, did not seem too impressed with the joke. “Don’t try to insult my work! Do you know how wonderful and exciting it would be…? To realize, one day, that there are many more people like us, in some place far away. It would be great… communicating with each other… exchanging ideas, and technologies… can you even dream of the possibilities of the impact on our people, knowing that there is another world… all that ‘science fiction’ coming true one day…”

Murali, certainly, had not expected that the follow-up to his simple joke would be a miniature speech by Ravi.

He tried to change the topic “Relax, Ravi! I’m sure your efforts won’t go to waste… Do you remember you invited me to dinner at your house tonight? It’s almost 6! We better start now…”
Ravi, after a slight expression of confusion at Murali’s words, remembered that he had indeed called him to his place for dinner that day.

In 30 minutes, they were at Ravi’s place. His wife Shyamala was busy in the kitchen, since she had to cook for Murali too, apart from her husband and two children.

Murali looked around the house. The children, Santhosh and Radha, were doing there homework with a tired expression in their face.

“We never had so much work to do when we were at school, right, Ravi?” Murali turned to him and asked.

“Yes, but they’ve got no option. Got to do hard work if they need good marks.” replied Ravi, who always thought himself as a good father, teaching his children to aim high. But the hard work of his children was not the only thing on his mind. The thought of discovering and meeting life in other planets had really occupied his mind a lot lately.

In about 10 minutes, dinner was on the table… the children were done with their work… and everybody were ready to eat.

“Appa, you know something very exciting happened today…” Santhosh said excitedly looking at his father.

“Really… what? Did you get your test marks?” Ravi asked

“No Appa, what is so exciting about that…?” Radha asked back, wanting to join in at what her elder brother had started.

“Then…?” Ravi seemed somewhat disinterested on what the children had to say.

“Even Mummy knows, pa.” Santosh glanced at Shyamala

Ravi looked at his wife, let out a sigh, and his eyes went back to the plate.

Shyamala could sense that her husband was in no mood to play guessing games, and started speaking “We have new neighbours…”

“Oh I see…”

“Hey that’s very nice. Is it a big family?” Murali seemed more excited than Ravi at this point, to know about the new neighbours.

“No, just a couple of newly-weds. I spoke to the wife. Her name’s Sita, she’s very sweet. Seems her husband got a job in a software firm in Chennai. So they have moved here from Madurai.”

The children seemed very confused by Ravi’s silence.

“Appa what’s wrong?” Santhosh asked his father

“Nothing.” Ravi replied

“You don’t want to know about the new neighbours?”

“No… what’s there to know…”

“But Appa, it will be wonderful… we can talk with them and learn many new things… about them, their family, their cities… it will be interesting knowing everything. Why are you like this, Appa? Why don’t you find anything exciting about knowing new people?”

Murali could only laugh at the strange similarity and yet, the irony, that was present between what the child had said, and what he had heard from Ravi at the office. Ravi, however, continued to be interested in his meal, with least interest in his son’s words.

Other Life

Pre-Blog Statement: If you came in search of good fiction, then this is definitely not it! I took about 15 minutes to think and write this story… which means it’s not very good… and the fact that I was writing this with a headache didn’t make matters any better. So let this piece stay for a while before I get my lazy-self to refine it later…

“This has got to work!” Ravi spoke with a look of anxiety, “I’ve been spending months on trying to build this system.”

“Stop being so paranoid, Ravi. You know hard work never goes to waste…” said Murali, his fellow scentist at the Akshaya Space Centre.

“Sure hope you are right. Well, do you believe that there is life on other planets?”

“Maybe…”

“What do you mean ‘Maybe’? There have been so many signs over the past few decades… there may be something out there… maybe humans like us… or maybe better evolved…”

“Yes, yes. I’m sure there are people out there in some distant planet… and maybe there’s someone named Ravi there too, who wants to know so much about life here!” said Murali, grinning at his colleague.

Ravi, however, did not seem too impressed with the joke. “Don’t try to insult my work! Do you know how wonderful and exciting it would be…? To realize, one day, that there are many more people like us, in some place far away. It would be great… communicating with each other… exchanging ideas, and technologies… can you even dream of the possibilities of the impact on our people, knowing that there is another world… all that ‘science fiction’ coming true one day…”

Murali, certainly, had not expected that the follow-up to his simple joke would be a miniature speech by Ravi.

He tried to change the topic “Relax, Ravi! I’m sure your efforts won’t go to waste… Do you remember you invited me to dinner at your house tonight? It’s almost 6! We better start now…”
Ravi, after a slight expression of confusion at Murali’s words, remembered that he had indeed called him to his place for dinner that day.

In 30 minutes, they were at Ravi’s place. His wife Shyamala was busy in the kitchen, since she had to cook for Murali too, apart from her husband and two children.

Murali looked around the house. The children, Santhosh and Radha, were doing there homework with a tired expression in their face.

“We never had so much work to do when we were at school, right, Ravi?” Murali turned to him and asked.

“Yes, but they’ve got no option. Got to do hard work if they need good marks.” replied Ravi, who always thought himself as a good father, teaching his children to aim high. But the hard work of his children was not the only thing on his mind. The thought of discovering and meeting life in other planets had really occupied his mind a lot lately.

In about 10 minutes, dinner was on the table… the children were done with their work… and everybody were ready to eat.

“Appa, you know something very exciting happened today…” Santhosh said excitedly looking at his father.

“Really… what? Did you get your test marks?” Ravi asked

“No Appa, what is so exciting about that…?” Radha asked back, wanting to join in at what her elder brother had started.

“Then…?” Ravi seemed somewhat disinterested on what the children had to say.

“Even Mummy knows, pa.” Santosh glanced at Shyamala

Ravi looked at his wife, let out a sigh, and his eyes went back to the plate.

Shyamala could sense that her husband was in no mood to play guessing games, and started speaking “We have new neighbours…”

“Oh I see…”

“Hey that’s very nice. Is it a big family?” Murali seemed more excited than Ravi at this point, to know about the new neighbours.

“No, just a couple of newly-weds. I spoke to the wife. Her name’s Sita, she’s very sweet. Seems her husband got a job in a software firm in Chennai. So they have moved here from Madurai.”

The children seemed very confused by Ravi’s silence.

“Appa what’s wrong?” Santhosh asked his father

“Nothing.” Ravi replied

“You don’t want to know about the new neighbours?”

“No… what’s there to know…”

“But Appa, it will be wonderful… we can talk with them and learn many new things… about them, their family, their cities… it will be interesting knowing everything. Why are you like this, Appa? Why don’t you find anything exciting about knowing new people?”

Murali could only laugh at the strange similarity and yet, the irony, that was present between what the child had said, and what he had heard from Ravi at the office. Ravi, however, continued to be interested in his meal, with least interest in his son’s words.

Mingling Hearts, Fading Hatred

About 10 years ago, the thought of an Indian and Pakistani holding hands would have evoked a sigh from peace-lovers and would have even seemed funny for some. But, thanks to the developments in recent years, especially in the aftermath of the India-Pakistan cricket series this year, all of us can hope to see people of the two nations mingling with each other regularly.

After decades of hatred, the two countries are taking solid steps to become closer to each other. Forget the Kashmir issue… forget what the cynics are saying… whatever the differences that may exist between the countries, as was said in a statement after Musharraf’s visit this year, the peace process has indeed become irreversible. And it is because – beyond the efforts of the two governments – the people from both sides now know each other. This is much unlike previous generations, when children grew up learning that the ‘other side’ was bad. Frankly, my political knowledge is very bad, but I don’t care. Politics can do little harm when the public have strong impressions in their mind.

The new-found friendship was evident during the cricket series in February-March 2005. It’s no secret that hundreds of Pakistanis crossed the borders to ‘watch’ the cricket matches, but only a part of them were actually present in the stadiums witnessing the games. They made most out of the oppurtunity to know the culture and people of the country, which is very much similar to theirs – from food to movies to music. Indian homes happily welcomed their visitors from other sides of the border. Some Pakistanis even made trips to their ancestral homes. Even the heads of the two nations used this as an oppurtunity to hold discussions, which mostly turned out to be positive, though concrete solutions were not put in place.

During the matches too, an air of friendship was spread around the ground. It was not like war anymore. Supporters of each nation openly acknowledged good performances from the other team. India’s loss did not bother Indians much. The aim of the series was not winning or losing, but improving the ties between the two countries. Chennai of 1999, the popular act of a standing ovation given to the Pakistan team when they won a test, may have been the leading example in this exercise. The same spirit spreading across the country is a good sign.

The visitors returned home a happy lot. Indians, too, were surprised and all their illusions of Pakistanis were shattered. All this was followed by the flagging off of the Srinagar-Muzzafurabad buses. The passengers, though threatened by militants – explosives were unearthed from the path of the vehicle – crossed the border bravely.

The most significant part of all these developments, is the people. Indians and Pakistanis now freely mingle with, and understand, each other. After this stage, nothing can change their impressions of the other side of the border. This kind of healthy interaction and people-to-people contact is exactly what is required. Even if the Kashmir problem is not solved soon enough, one can be assured that it will not bring hatred in the hearts of the people.

And while we all celebrate the new found closeness between the two nations, let us take a moment to remember Baby Noor, the child from Pakistan treated for a cardiac problem in a Bangalore Hospital. It was followed by many such successful ventures, and more Pakistanis coming into the country. The hype created around Baby Noor was so much that she almost became the official initiator of friendship between India and Pakistan.

And while the child grows up thanking the Indian doctors, let us thank her for being the first Symbol of Peace between two troubled nations.

Mingling Hearts, Fading Hatred

About 10 years ago, the thought of an Indian and Pakistani holding hands would have evoked a sigh from peace-lovers and would have even seemed funny for some. But, thanks to the developments in recent years, especially in the aftermath of the India-Pakistan cricket series this year, all of us can hope to see people of the two nations mingling with each other regularly.

After decades of hatred, the two countries are taking solid steps to become closer to each other. Forget the Kashmir issue… forget what the cynics are saying… whatever the differences that may exist between the countries, as was said in a statement after Musharraf’s visit this year, the peace process has indeed become irreversible. And it is because – beyond the efforts of the two governments – the people from both sides now know each other. This is much unlike previous generations, when children grew up learning that the ‘other side’ was bad. Frankly, my political knowledge is very bad, but I don’t care. Politics can do little harm when the public have strong impressions in their mind.

The new-found friendship was evident during the cricket series in February-March 2005. It’s no secret that hundreds of Pakistanis crossed the borders to ‘watch’ the cricket matches, but only a part of them were actually present in the stadiums witnessing the games. They made most out of the oppurtunity to know the culture and people of the country, which is very much similar to theirs – from food to movies to music. Indian homes happily welcomed their visitors from other sides of the border. Some Pakistanis even made trips to their ancestral homes. Even the heads of the two nations used this as an oppurtunity to hold discussions, which mostly turned out to be positive, though concrete solutions were not put in place.

During the matches too, an air of friendship was spread around the ground. It was not like war anymore. Supporters of each nation openly acknowledged good performances from the other team. India’s loss did not bother Indians much. The aim of the series was not winning or losing, but improving the ties between the two countries. Chennai of 1999, the popular act of a standing ovation given to the Pakistan team when they won a test, may have been the leading example in this exercise. The same spirit spreading across the country is a good sign.

The visitors returned home a happy lot. Indians, too, were surprised and all their illusions of Pakistanis were shattered. All this was followed by the flagging off of the Srinagar-Muzzafurabad buses. The passengers, though threatened by militants – explosives were unearthed from the path of the vehicle – crossed the border bravely.

The most significant part of all these developments, is the people. Indians and Pakistanis now freely mingle with, and understand, each other. After this stage, nothing can change their impressions of the other side of the border. This kind of healthy interaction and people-to-people contact is exactly what is required. Even if the Kashmir problem is not solved soon enough, one can be assured that it will not bring hatred in the hearts of the people.

And while we all celebrate the new found closeness between the two nations, let us take a moment to remember Baby Noor, the child from Pakistan treated for a cardiac problem in a Bangalore Hospital. It was followed by many such successful ventures, and more Pakistanis coming into the country. The hype created around Baby Noor was so much that she almost became the official initiator of friendship between India and Pakistan.

And while the child grows up thanking the Indian doctors, let us thank her for being the first Symbol of Peace between two troubled nations.