Final Destination

Once a child

I went out to play

Won most of the games

I felt happy

But the world held

Many winners like me…

Will I be the best?

Once a student

I studied hard

Scoring well

I felt happy

But the world held

Many students like me…

Will I be the best?

Once a worker

I worked with all my heart

With a good salary

I felt happy

But the world held

Many workers like me…

Will I be the best?

Posing me the same question…

Life took me ahead and ahead

Ahead of all else

Here I am today

I am the best!

Now I reflect

Did I really achieve

Being the best?

What did I want to do…

Going ahead of all like me?

Whom do I ask?

There is nobody like me

Nobody with me…

Final Destination

Once a child
I went out to play
Won most of the games
I felt happy
But the world held
Many winners like me…
Will I be the best?

Once a student
I studied hard
Scoring well
I felt happy
But the world held
Many students like me…
Will I be the best?

Once a worker
I worked with all my heart
With a good salary
I felt happy
But the world held
Many workers like me…
Will I be the best?

Posing me the same question…
Life took me ahead and ahead
Ahead of all else
Here I am today
I am the best!

Now I reflect
Did I really achieve
Being the best?
What did I want to do…
Going ahead of all like me?

Whom do I ask?
There is nobody like me
Nobody with me…

Dawn or Dusk???

Pre-Blog Statement – Before you start reading this I must tell you that I’m not too good at writing stories… Now that you have been warned… you may proceed…

Sanjana was a bright young girl. But, born blind, she was forced to literally lead her life in darkness. When children her age were experiencing the beauty and wonders that life revealed to them each day, her thoughts were confined to what she felt through her mind. She had heard so much from her parents and peers about how beautiful the world outside was. There were days when she longed to be able to see and experience all that she had heard. But the doctors had told that they could not give her sight before she was an adult. But Sanjana wasn’t too much bothered about it. She had a wonderful family. She did not need sight to know the amount of love that her parents and elder sister Ranjani showered on her.

She was going to be 18 today, and in a week her eyes would be operated on. She was delighted. All day she was talking about all the things she would see and was asking a lot of questions to Ranjani. She was making a mental list on all the things that she wanted to see. The first would be her loving family. Then all the colourful trees, plants, and flowers. The list was quite a long one. One of the things in that list was the Television. Ranjani had told her about all the wonderful things one could see and learn from it. So far Sanjana had only heard the noises of people talking on television. So she was curious about how the pictures in it would be.

The day finally arrived. A kind soul who had wanted his eyes to be donated had passed away a few days ago. Sanjana was going to be the recipient of the eyes. The operation started at 9am and took hardly a couple of hours. The doctors said she must not open her eyes for the next three days. Sanjana spent the next two days with curious thoughts flooding her mind.

Then, on the evening of the third day, the kind doctor came to see her. He told her she would now be able to see. Sanjana’s heart was beating fast with excitement. The bandage wrapped around her eyes were removed with care.

The doctor said “Sanjana, open your eyes slowly.”

Sanjana tried. For a second, the bright light coming into the room made her eye pain a little. But in a few seconds, the pain went away. Then, slowly, she opened her eyes completely. Her family was right by the bedside.

“Oh! Sanjana!” her mother hugged her and wept.

She was delighted to be able to see the people she loved so much. Then her eyes searched for the doctor who had cured her. She recognized him instantly as she had heard from Ranjani about the white coats that doctors usually wear.

“Thank you!” her newly opened eyes spoke for her.

The doctor smiled.

When Sanjana was being taken home their family car, she could hardly turn her face away from the window. A large number of images crowded her mind.

“Those big things are trees. There are plants! That is a dog.” She kept guessing about everything she saw. For those she couldn’t recognize, she clarified from Ranjani seated next to her. When they reached home, it was almost night time.

“Can I see the television, ma?” Sanjana asked.

“No, dear, you will harm your eyes if you see it today. Wait for another day.” her mother replied

What her mother said bothered her the least. Her eyes were so overwhelmed by so many images that now they were very tired. She happily went to sleep. All that night, she dreamt about what she had seen from the moment she had opened her eyes.

The next day she woke up very late. For her, every second seemed beautiful. She went out onto the street.

“Ma, why are there so many colorful lights?” she enquired

“It’s a festival, dear! Don’t you remember what it is?” her mother asked her, looking amused at her puzzled expression.

Suddenly, the cooker in the kitchen called mother by letting out a big whistle.

Sanjana had been so excited about being able to see, that she could hardly remember anything else! She then went into her home and forgot all about the lights. She opened some books that she found and tried to see the pictures that she found. The rest of the day went by with Sanjana trying to learn more things.

The next day, she woke up with a lot of excitement. She would be able to see the television today! It was a Sunday.
She called out to Ranjani “Can I see the television now?”.

“Uh… Ok” Ranjani sounded very hesitant. But Sanjana did not care. Her curiosity got the better of her. She went to the living room. The television was already on. She hurried and seated herself next to her mother who was intently watching with a lot of concern. Sanjana saw the television about what was so interesting.

What she saw shocked her. This was not the television as she had wanted to see. It showed a huge gush of water washing away people like ants. Every second, a large number of dead bodies were flashed across the screen. Bodies of little children were also shown, their mothers weeping over them. Many huts were lying flat on the ground. People were crying and shouting for help. Dead people were just strewn around like garbage, some without hands and legs.

The fresh new pair of eyes let out it’s first tear. For the rest of that day, Sanjana hoped and prayed she was blind again.

Dawn or Dusk???

Pre-Blog Statement – Before you start reading this I must tell you that I’m not too good at writing stories… Now that you have been warned… you may proceed…

Sanjana was a bright young girl. But, born blind, she was forced to literally lead her life in darkness. When children her age were experiencing the beauty and wonders that life revealed to them each day, her thoughts were confined to what she felt through her mind. She had heard so much from her parents and peers about how beautiful the world outside was. There were days when she longed to be able to see and experience all that she had heard. But the doctors had told that they could not give her sight before she was an adult. But Sanjana wasn’t too much bothered about it. She had a wonderful family. She did not need sight to know the amount of love that her parents and elder sister Ranjani showered on her.

She was going to be 18 today, and in a week her eyes would be operated on. She was delighted. All day she was talking about all the things she would see and was asking a lot of questions to Ranjani. She was making a mental list on all the things that she wanted to see. The first would be her loving family. Then all the colourful trees, plants, and flowers. The list was quite a long one. One of the things in that list was the Television. Ranjani had told her about all the wonderful things one could see and learn from it. So far Sanjana had only heard the noises of people talking on television. So she was curious about how the pictures in it would be.

The day finally arrived. A kind soul who had wanted his eyes to be donated had passed away a few days ago. Sanjana was going to be the recipient of the eyes. The operation started at 9am and took hardly a couple of hours. The doctors said she must not open her eyes for the next three days. Sanjana spent the next two days with curious thoughts flooding her mind.

Then, on the evening of the third day, the kind doctor came to see her. He told her she would now be able to see. Sanjana’s heart was beating fast with excitement. The bandage wrapped around her eyes were removed with care.

The doctor said “Sanjana, open your eyes slowly.”

Sanjana tried. For a second, the bright light coming into the room made her eye pain a little. But in a few seconds, the pain went away. Then, slowly, she opened her eyes completely. Her family was right by the bedside.

“Oh! Sanjana!” her mother hugged her and wept.

She was delighted to be able to see the people she loved so much. Then her eyes searched for the doctor who had cured her. She recognized him instantly as she had heard from Ranjani about the white coats that doctors usually wear.

“Thank you!” her newly opened eyes spoke for her.

The doctor smiled.

When Sanjana was being taken home their family car, she could hardly turn her face away from the window. A large number of images crowded her mind.

“Those big things are trees. There are plants! That is a dog.” She kept guessing about everything she saw. For those she couldn’t recognize, she clarified from Ranjani seated next to her. When they reached home, it was almost night time.

“Can I see the television, ma?” Sanjana asked.

“No, dear, you will harm your eyes if you see it today. Wait for another day.” her mother replied

What her mother said bothered her the least. Her eyes were so overwhelmed by so many images that now they were very tired. She happily went to sleep. All that night, she dreamt about what she had seen from the moment she had opened her eyes.

The next day she woke up very late. For her, every second seemed beautiful. She went out onto the street.

“Ma, why are there so many colorful lights?” she enquired

“It’s a festival, dear! Don’t you remember what it is?” her mother asked her, looking amused at her puzzled expression.

Suddenly, the cooker in the kitchen called mother by letting out a big whistle.

Sanjana had been so excited about being able to see, that she could hardly remember anything else! She then went into her home and forgot all about the lights. She opened some books that she found and tried to see the pictures that she found. The rest of the day went by with Sanjana trying to learn more things.

The next day, she woke up with a lot of excitement. She would be able to see the television today! It was a Sunday.
She called out to Ranjani “Can I see the television now?”.

“Uh… Ok” Ranjani sounded very hesitant. But Sanjana did not care. Her curiosity got the better of her. She went to the living room. The television was already on. She hurried and seated herself next to her mother who was intently watching with a lot of concern. Sanjana saw the television about what was so interesting.

What she saw shocked her. This was not the television as she had wanted to see. It showed a huge gush of water washing away people like ants. Every second, a large number of dead bodies were flashed across the screen. Bodies of little children were also shown, their mothers weeping over them. Many huts were lying flat on the ground. People were crying and shouting for help. Dead people were just strewn around like garbage, some without hands and legs.

The fresh new pair of eyes let out it’s first tear. For the rest of that day, Sanjana hoped and prayed she was blind again.

The Irony – II

A simple man

Thoughts so pure,

Said to all he met

“Do not search for God, He is within you”

Scoffed at, named insane

He was driven away

Days went by

Then he returned

He had a beard

Body wrapped in saffron

Changed beyond recognition

He sat under a tree

To those who passed, said

“Do not search for God, He is within you”

All stopped to listen,

Fell at his feet

“We are mere mortals, you are Great”

Looking away

India is developing at an unbelievable rate. 10 years ago, nobody would have thought that our nation would soon become the fourth largest economy in the world. But there is one mentality that has not left the minds of our people for a long time – the awe of the west.

In the medieval age, India was flourishing and it was the dream of many traders and merchants around the world to come here and make wealth. And who can forget the wonderful contributions our ancestors made to science, including the invention of zero, without which computers today would be impossible. But still, we consider being ‘Indian’ as someting to be ashamed of and try to imitate the west and their ways. Little do we realize that it was our nation that was in the forefront of development even before civilization was born in rest of the world. It is sad that, even these findings, were not belived before foreign researchers said so. Consider Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen, he was virtually unknown, suddenly one day we saw someone from India get a Nobel prize, and then we heaped praise on him about what a great ecomomist he was. This is just a small example.

Think about what happened to Yoga and Ayurveda. Years ago, such practices were considered old and useless. But after americans started adopting it slowly and western doctors discovered the wonderful results, Indians today are increasingly starting to adopt this method while hailing ‘our culture’. Nothing can be more shameful than accepting our own culture and heritage after certification is received from another nation.

The truth today stands like this – We are looking at the west and copying their culture, while the west is looking toward us and realizing the beauty of our culture. What we have thrown away as junk, are ancient treasures to the west. It’s high time we realized what our culture really is, and be proud of our ancestors for their foresight.

The Irony – II

A simple man
Thoughts so pure,
Said to all he met
“Do not search for God, He is within you”

Scoffed at, named insane
He was driven away
Days went by
Then he returned

He had a beard
Body wrapped in saffron
Changed beyond recognition
He sat under a tree

To those who passed, said
“Do not search for God, He is within you”
All stopped to listen,
Fell at his feet
“We are mere mortals, you are Great”

Looking away

India is developing at an unbelievable rate. 10 years ago, nobody would have thought that our nation would soon become the fourth largest economy in the world. But there is one mentality that has not left the minds of our people for a long time – the awe of the west.

In the medieval age, India was flourishing and it was the dream of many traders and merchants around the world to come here and make wealth. And who can forget the wonderful contributions our ancestors made to science, including the invention of zero, without which computers today would be impossible. But still, we consider being ‘Indian’ as someting to be ashamed of and try to imitate the west and their ways. Little do we realize that it was our nation that was in the forefront of development even before civilization was born in rest of the world. It is sad that, even these findings, were not belived before foreign researchers said so. Consider Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen, he was virtually unknown, suddenly one day we saw someone from India get a Nobel prize, and then we heaped praise on him about what a great ecomomist he was. This is just a small example.

Think about what happened to Yoga and Ayurveda. Years ago, such practices were considered old and useless. But after americans started adopting it slowly and western doctors discovered the wonderful results, Indians today are increasingly starting to adopt this method while hailing ‘our culture’. Nothing can be more shameful than accepting our own culture and heritage after certification is received from another nation.

The truth today stands like this – We are looking at the west and copying their culture, while the west is looking toward us and realizing the beauty of our culture. What we have thrown away as junk, are ancient treasures to the west. It’s high time we realized what our culture really is, and be proud of our ancestors for their foresight.

The Irony

I have no job, I said

They did not notice

I have no money, I wept

They did not hear

I have no food, I cried

They did not care

Today, grief all around

With the fear of death looming large

Me and many with lives so similar

Homes and children

Fed to the sea

We have been affected, they say

Those who

Did not notice, hear, care

Today they ask, our well-being

They care for our life

They fear our death

But the price we had to pay

For our voice to be heard

Aid is here, but where?

In what has been the largest relief effort in many decades, aid for the tsunami victims is pouring in from all over the world. The UN alone has announced a net collection of US $3 billion. All of us are concerned about the victims and want their lives to return to normal as soon as possible. True, help is coming in from all over. But is it reaching the people who need it?

I don’t want to sound pessimistic, but the truth is that not all the relief contributed by so many kind-hearted people around the world reaches the victims. Caste, which has played havoc in many a small village in India, is once again considered a condition which prioritizes who recieves how much. As if that’s not bad enough, some of the relief is being accepted by people who have not lost much at all. Meanwhile, those who have lost their homes and property do not get what they need.

The next problem is the kind of aid that comes. However well-intentioned the act might be, some people give away old clothes (sometimes unwashed) and food items that become stale before they reach the victims. Anybody reading regularly on the tsunami would be aware of the long string of clothes lying by the roadside in districts like Nagapattinam and the food that usually ends up being consumed by dogs.

When so many people come forward and help with goodwill, it is sad to see their help go to waste sometimes. Yes, it is an exception. Such little incidents become irrelevant compared to the larger picture, which shows the aid is helping many people rebuild their lives and nations are slowly limping back to normalcy. But only in a world that sees all such help coming not only as a product of sympathy or moral duty, but with a little love and concern mixed with it, will we see a complete elimination of such inefficencies in relief work of such magnitude.